138° Is Henderson’s Newest Dry-Aged Steakhouse

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Served is no longer serving, but fans of popular local chef Matthew Meyer are swiftly learning that he’s still heating up the Henderson food scene, this time with 138°, which opened October 15.

That 138° is Meyer’s evolution of his breakfast and lunch spot, Served, and its more ambitious successor, Served Global Dining, is obvious from the moment customers walk in the door at 1450 West Horizon Ridge Parkway (the former location of Served Global, at the intersection with Stephanie Street). The first thing to catch the eye is the array of meat — plus fish and duck — displayed in glass-fronted dry-aging coolers. Straight ahead is an intimate lounge.

Matthew Meyer
Matthew Meyer

It’s in the dining area, though, where Meyer’s evolution becomes most obvious. Unlike its brighter predecessors, 138° — which refers to the optimal temperature for steak to be served — has a subdued elegance, with muted earth tones and whisper-soft lighting. There’s a live fire, adding a hint of coziness on a cool evening. More dry-aging cases line one wall — apropos, since they’re really the heart of the restaurant. “It’s a part of the room,” he says.

Seared foie gras and pear on a plate with a drizzle of balsamic.

138°
138°

A burger with a butcher knife through the center.

138°
138°

Meyer, who concedes that “there was no consistent messaging” in the one-year lifespan of Served Global, says this one has a more clear-cut mission. “I focused on what I wanted to do from a cooking aspect,” he says. And it’s driven by his visits to ranches and farms to source the best products. “It sort of unraveled from the sourcing,” says Meyer. One of his beef suppliers is Perigo Hay and Cattle in Lund, Nevada, in White Pine County near Ely. “That’s the one we’re most proud of,” Meyer says, not only because it’s a Nevada business but also because it’s small enough to be different. “They come and drop it off personally.”

Dry-aged beef at 138°

138°
138°

He also dry-ages beef from Five Dollar Ranch in Susanville, California and Stemple Creek in Marin County, California. The dry-aging section of his menu currently includes a Perigo ribeye, Five Dot Ranch ribeye, and New York and Stemple Creek grass-fed New York and ribeye, all of which are priced by the pound and aging. He’ll soon add wagyu-Angus beef from a ranch in Montana.

Cured salmon with preserved lemon dashi and bonito.

138°
138°

A cooler of dry-aged beef.

138°
138°

And once he had selected his beef suppliers, dry-aging was just a given. “It’s the only thing that adds depth of flavor to beef,” he says. The process refines the texture and concentrates the flavor of the meat, which is finished on a wood-fired grill. But hey, lots of places in town dry-age beef — Meyer’s also doing it with fish, duck, and pork. He said he’d heard about a chef in Australia who pioneered the fin-to-tail process, which is cropping up in restaurants in New York and Southern California but is by no means widespread.

On Meyer’s menu, dry-aging shows up in dishes such as salmon with citrus supremes and “everything” bagel chips, a sublime combo that evokes the cuisines of California and New York. Or whole grilled branzino with California Gold saffron rice, roasted vegetables, and a tomato-herb salad. The Corvus Farms duck breast is an extremely appealing dish, graced with roasted butternut squash, plantains, chocolate mole, and a mezcal beurre blanc. Meyer says he ages the duck for two weeks. “It gets rid of extra moisture in the skin,” he says. “It just renders it down,” in a process similar to that used in the preparation of Peking Duck.

Duck confit wontons topped with microgreens and sauce.

Duck confit wontons
138°

For those looking for something a little lighter, 138° offers lamb and beef burgers, the latter with pork belly or truffle chips, for instance. There also are salads, starters such as P.E.I. mussels with lemongrass jus or beef tartare with crispy brioche, and entrees including Beef Stroganoff, Nantucket jumbo scallops, chicken, lamb chops, and a vegan mushroom tamal. Sides such as roasted mushrooms and a savory mole kugel and sauces such as a house-made A1 and “old-fashioned” Hollandaise complete the picture.

Salmon fillet plated with pureed cauliflower.

Ora King Salmon
138°

Brunch, with such options as a roasted pork belly Benedict, house-cured corned beef hash and eggs or duck confit wontons, is served from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekends. Dinner is served from 5 to 9 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays.

Adam Carroll leads the bar program, for which he has created cocktails such as Just a Sip, a blend of Garrison Brothers Small Batch Amaretto Liqueur and black strap and black-walnut bitters, smoked with a wine-barrel stave and served from within a smoking mini-cask. Gene Samuel is general manager. With a renewed focus for his 138*, Meyer clearly has one goal in mind: “We want to be the only ones who have what we have in Las Vegas.”

An entree from 138 with sauce and greens.

138°
138°

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